http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

Secret flying saucer plans declassified

http://www.space.com/11627-alien-planets-rogue-interstellar-extraterrestrial-life.html

Real-life Avatar: The first mind-controlled robot surrogate

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

Kepler found an earth-like planet about 500 light years away in the constellation Cygnus. NASA describes it as an “earth cousin”, with many similar properties to earth.

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

Using NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the “habitable zone” — the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun.

While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth.

“The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth,” said Paul Hertz, NASA’s Astrophysics Division director at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope, will discover the nearest rocky exoplanets and determine their composition and atmospheric conditions, continuing humankind’s quest to find truly Earth-like worlds.”

Although the size of Kepler-186f is known, its mass and composition are not. Previous research, however, suggests that a planet the size of Kepler-186f is likely to be rocky.

“We know of just one planet where life exists — Earth. When we search for life outside our solar system we focus on finding planets with characteristics that mimic that of Earth,” said Elisa Quintana, research scientist at the SETI Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of the paper published today in the journal Science. “Finding a habitable zone planet comparable to Earth in size is a major step forward.”

Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system, about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four companion planets, which orbit a star half the size and mass of our sun. The star is classified as an M dwarf, or red dwarf, a class of stars that makes up 70 percent of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

“M dwarfs are the most numerous stars,” said Quintana. “The first signs of other life in the galaxy may well come from planets orbiting an M dwarf.”

Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130-days and receives one-third the energy from its star that Earth gets from the sun, placing it nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone. On the surface of Kepler-186f, the brightness of its star at high noon is only as bright as our sun appears to us about an hour before sunset.

“Being in the habitable zone does not mean we know this planet is habitable. The temperature on the planet is strongly dependent on what kind of atmosphere the planet has,” said Thomas Barclay, research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at Ames, and co-author of the paper. “Kepler-186f can be thought of as an Earth-cousin rather than an Earth-twin. It has many properties that resemble Earth.”

The four companion planets, Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d, and Kepler-186e, whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13, and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth.

The next steps in the search for distant life include looking for true Earth-twins — Earth-size planets orbiting within the habitable zone of a sun-like star — and measuring the their chemical compositions. The Kepler Space Telescope, which simultaneously and continuously measured the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, is NASA’s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets around stars like our sun.

Ames is responsible for Kepler’s ground system development, mission operations, and science data analysis. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colo., developed the Kepler flight system and supports mission operations with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore archives, hosts and distributes Kepler science data. Kepler is NASA’s 10th Discovery Mission and was funded by the agency’s Science Mission Directorate.

The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach. The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe.
For more information about the Kepler mission, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/kepler
-end-

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#2 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #2 WxUSAF Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:06 PM
12,769 posts

Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#3 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #3 pazzo83 Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:45 PM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:06 PM, said:
Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.

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#4 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #4 masomenos Posted 17 April 2014 – 09:46 PM
1,348 posts

IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.

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#5 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #5 WxUSAF Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:02 AM
12,769 posts

pazzo83, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:45 PM, said:
Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

Orographic Lift, on 17 Apr 2014 – 9:46 PM, said:
IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.
:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#6 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #6 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 11:32 AM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Well I think the real problem here is that NASA’s budget is criminally small.

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#7 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #7 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:18 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

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#8 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #8 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:39 PM
18,629 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.

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#9 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #9 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:12 PM
1,348 posts

pazzo83, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:39 PM, said:
What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.
Can’t say I totally agree. We’re not even close to fully understanding the atmospheric compositions of planets within our own solar system, what makes you think we’re any closer to understanding planets 500 light years away? Kepler pretty much just confirmed things we generally knew about the universe. The general consensus that earth-like planets are relatively common in the galaxy and beyond had been formed over 20 years ago. Don’t get me wrong, the information gathered by Kepler is interesting and intriguing, but I just feel missions like Kepler aren’t the best use of our research budget.

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#10 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #10 RedSky Posted 19 April 2014 – 02:04 AM
4,859 posts

The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

January 2016 – month of the epic day 10 storm AND the epic storm

Winter 2015-2016 snow total 32.2″

10/18 – flurries
1/12 – .2″
1/17 – .3″
1/22-23 25″
2/5 – .7″
2/9-11 4.3″
2/15 – 1″
3/4 – .7″
5/15 – T

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#11 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #11 WxUSAF Posted 21 April 2014 – 08:05 AM
12,769 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#12 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #12 masomenos Posted 23 April 2014 – 09:21 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 21 Apr 2014 – 08:05 AM, said:
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.
3845…wow that’s a big jump from the last time I read up on Kepler sometime last year.

Even before we developed the tech necessary to discovering exo-planets, I think it would be beyond naive to assume that most planetary systems are similar to our own. I mean the varying compositions and arrangements of planetary systems throughout the galaxy and beyond are probably as numerous as the amount of stars themselves. The possibilities are endless and the true anomalies are beyond our wildest imaginations.

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#13 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #13 eyewall Posted 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM
7,431 posts

RedSky, on 19 Apr 2014 – 02:04 AM, said:
The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.

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#14 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #14 Tyler Penland Posted 21 June 2014 – 05:15 PM

Future Met

726 posts

eyewall, on 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM, said:
We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.
One minor problem with M-dwarfs, though, is that they are a bit, well, unstable. Pretty well known type for sudden decreases/increases in stellar output. Not that life couldn’t overcome that, but it would make it much more difficult.

Also, we don’t know yet if the particular planet in question (186f) is tidally locked for sure yet. What I’ve read suggests not but it’s more or less impossible to detect just yet.
http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/april/nasas-kepler-telescope-discovers-first-earth-size-planet-in-habitable-zone

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

Secret flying saucer plans declassified

http://www.space.com/11627-alien-planets-rogue-interstellar-extraterrestrial-life.html

Real-life Avatar: The first mind-controlled robot surrogate

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

Kepler found an earth-like planet about 500 light years away in the constellation Cygnus. NASA describes it as an “earth cousin”, with many similar properties to earth.

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

Using NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the “habitable zone” — the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun.

While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth.

“The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth,” said Paul Hertz, NASA’s Astrophysics Division director at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope, will discover the nearest rocky exoplanets and determine their composition and atmospheric conditions, continuing humankind’s quest to find truly Earth-like worlds.”

Although the size of Kepler-186f is known, its mass and composition are not. Previous research, however, suggests that a planet the size of Kepler-186f is likely to be rocky.

“We know of just one planet where life exists — Earth. When we search for life outside our solar system we focus on finding planets with characteristics that mimic that of Earth,” said Elisa Quintana, research scientist at the SETI Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of the paper published today in the journal Science. “Finding a habitable zone planet comparable to Earth in size is a major step forward.”

Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system, about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four companion planets, which orbit a star half the size and mass of our sun. The star is classified as an M dwarf, or red dwarf, a class of stars that makes up 70 percent of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

“M dwarfs are the most numerous stars,” said Quintana. “The first signs of other life in the galaxy may well come from planets orbiting an M dwarf.”

Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130-days and receives one-third the energy from its star that Earth gets from the sun, placing it nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone. On the surface of Kepler-186f, the brightness of its star at high noon is only as bright as our sun appears to us about an hour before sunset.

“Being in the habitable zone does not mean we know this planet is habitable. The temperature on the planet is strongly dependent on what kind of atmosphere the planet has,” said Thomas Barclay, research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at Ames, and co-author of the paper. “Kepler-186f can be thought of as an Earth-cousin rather than an Earth-twin. It has many properties that resemble Earth.”

The four companion planets, Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d, and Kepler-186e, whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13, and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth.

The next steps in the search for distant life include looking for true Earth-twins — Earth-size planets orbiting within the habitable zone of a sun-like star — and measuring the their chemical compositions. The Kepler Space Telescope, which simultaneously and continuously measured the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, is NASA’s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets around stars like our sun.

Ames is responsible for Kepler’s ground system development, mission operations, and science data analysis. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colo., developed the Kepler flight system and supports mission operations with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore archives, hosts and distributes Kepler science data. Kepler is NASA’s 10th Discovery Mission and was funded by the agency’s Science Mission Directorate.

The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach. The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe.
For more information about the Kepler mission, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/kepler
-end-

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#2 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #2 WxUSAF Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:06 PM
12,769 posts

Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#3 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #3 pazzo83 Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:45 PM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:06 PM, said:
Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.

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#4 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #4 masomenos Posted 17 April 2014 – 09:46 PM
1,348 posts

IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.

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#5 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #5 WxUSAF Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:02 AM
12,769 posts

pazzo83, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:45 PM, said:
Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

Orographic Lift, on 17 Apr 2014 – 9:46 PM, said:
IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.
:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#6 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #6 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 11:32 AM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Well I think the real problem here is that NASA’s budget is criminally small.

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#7 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #7 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:18 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

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#8 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #8 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:39 PM
18,629 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.

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#9 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #9 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:12 PM
1,348 posts

pazzo83, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:39 PM, said:
What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.
Can’t say I totally agree. We’re not even close to fully understanding the atmospheric compositions of planets within our own solar system, what makes you think we’re any closer to understanding planets 500 light years away? Kepler pretty much just confirmed things we generally knew about the universe. The general consensus that earth-like planets are relatively common in the galaxy and beyond had been formed over 20 years ago. Don’t get me wrong, the information gathered by Kepler is interesting and intriguing, but I just feel missions like Kepler aren’t the best use of our research budget.

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#10 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #10 RedSky Posted 19 April 2014 – 02:04 AM
4,859 posts

The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

January 2016 – month of the epic day 10 storm AND the epic storm

Winter 2015-2016 snow total 32.2″

10/18 – flurries
1/12 – .2″
1/17 – .3″
1/22-23 25″
2/5 – .7″
2/9-11 4.3″
2/15 – 1″
3/4 – .7″
5/15 – T

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#11 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #11 WxUSAF Posted 21 April 2014 – 08:05 AM
12,769 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#12 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #12 masomenos Posted 23 April 2014 – 09:21 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 21 Apr 2014 – 08:05 AM, said:
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.
3845…wow that’s a big jump from the last time I read up on Kepler sometime last year.

Even before we developed the tech necessary to discovering exo-planets, I think it would be beyond naive to assume that most planetary systems are similar to our own. I mean the varying compositions and arrangements of planetary systems throughout the galaxy and beyond are probably as numerous as the amount of stars themselves. The possibilities are endless and the true anomalies are beyond our wildest imaginations.

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#13 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #13 eyewall Posted 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM
7,431 posts

RedSky, on 19 Apr 2014 – 02:04 AM, said:
The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.

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#14 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #14 Tyler Penland Posted 21 June 2014 – 05:15 PM

Future Met

726 posts

eyewall, on 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM, said:
We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.
One minor problem with M-dwarfs, though, is that they are a bit, well, unstable. Pretty well known type for sudden decreases/increases in stellar output. Not that life couldn’t overcome that, but it would make it much more difficult.

Also, we don’t know yet if the particular planet in question (186f) is tidally locked for sure yet. What I’ve read suggests not but it’s more or less impossible to detect just yet.
http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/april/nasas-kepler-telescope-discovers-first-earth-size-planet-in-habitable-zone

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/16/us/space-anomaly-remains-mystery/index.html

http://www.popsci.com/study-confirms-that-alien-megastructure-star-is-weird

Secret flying saucer plans declassified

http://www.space.com/11627-alien-planets-rogue-interstellar-extraterrestrial-life.html

Real-life Avatar: The first mind-controlled robot surrogate

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/vast-methane-plumes-seen-in-arctic-ocean-as-sea-ice-retreats-6276278.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

http://news.yahoo.com/orphan-alien-planet-found-nearby-without-parent-star-122308193.html

Kepler found an earth-like planet about 500 light years away in the constellation Cygnus. NASA describes it as an “earth cousin”, with many similar properties to earth.

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

http://www.nasa.gov/…-habitable-zone

Using NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the “habitable zone” — the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun.

While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth.

“The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth,” said Paul Hertz, NASA’s Astrophysics Division director at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope, will discover the nearest rocky exoplanets and determine their composition and atmospheric conditions, continuing humankind’s quest to find truly Earth-like worlds.”

Although the size of Kepler-186f is known, its mass and composition are not. Previous research, however, suggests that a planet the size of Kepler-186f is likely to be rocky.

“We know of just one planet where life exists — Earth. When we search for life outside our solar system we focus on finding planets with characteristics that mimic that of Earth,” said Elisa Quintana, research scientist at the SETI Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of the paper published today in the journal Science. “Finding a habitable zone planet comparable to Earth in size is a major step forward.”

Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system, about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four companion planets, which orbit a star half the size and mass of our sun. The star is classified as an M dwarf, or red dwarf, a class of stars that makes up 70 percent of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

“M dwarfs are the most numerous stars,” said Quintana. “The first signs of other life in the galaxy may well come from planets orbiting an M dwarf.”

Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130-days and receives one-third the energy from its star that Earth gets from the sun, placing it nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone. On the surface of Kepler-186f, the brightness of its star at high noon is only as bright as our sun appears to us about an hour before sunset.

“Being in the habitable zone does not mean we know this planet is habitable. The temperature on the planet is strongly dependent on what kind of atmosphere the planet has,” said Thomas Barclay, research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at Ames, and co-author of the paper. “Kepler-186f can be thought of as an Earth-cousin rather than an Earth-twin. It has many properties that resemble Earth.”

The four companion planets, Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d, and Kepler-186e, whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13, and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth.

The next steps in the search for distant life include looking for true Earth-twins — Earth-size planets orbiting within the habitable zone of a sun-like star — and measuring the their chemical compositions. The Kepler Space Telescope, which simultaneously and continuously measured the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, is NASA’s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets around stars like our sun.

Ames is responsible for Kepler’s ground system development, mission operations, and science data analysis. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colo., developed the Kepler flight system and supports mission operations with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore archives, hosts and distributes Kepler science data. Kepler is NASA’s 10th Discovery Mission and was funded by the agency’s Science Mission Directorate.

The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach. The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe.
For more information about the Kepler mission, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/kepler
-end-

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#2 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #2 WxUSAF Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:06 PM
12,769 posts

Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#3 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #3 pazzo83 Posted 17 April 2014 – 03:45 PM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:06 PM, said:
Pretty awesome news. Planets like this one are likely to be extremely common in the universe given that M dwarf stars are the most common type. This planet is a little larger then Earth as well, which (all things being equal) gives it a better chance at having a thicker atmosphere and stronger greenhouse effect so it can warm up a bit. The planet only gets about 1/3rd the light that Earth does.

Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.

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#4 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #4 masomenos Posted 17 April 2014 – 09:46 PM
1,348 posts

IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.

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#5 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #5 WxUSAF Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:02 AM
12,769 posts

pazzo83, on 17 Apr 2014 – 3:45 PM, said:
Just blows my mind we almost cancelled the James Webb Space Telescope project in 2011, blows my mind. These are discoveries that will FOREVER change humanity.

Once we get some higher powered telescopes out into space (the JWST at the earth-sun l2 point, about 1mm miles from Earth is a good start), we will be able to better analyze these planets and their potential atmospheres. Hopefully within 10-15 years we’ll be able to pick up potential artificial light from them.
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

Orographic Lift, on 17 Apr 2014 – 9:46 PM, said:
IDK, I kind of question the scientific value of the Kepler missions. Yeah, it lays the groundwork for extra-solar planet detection, but what has it discovered that we didn’t really know before its launch? I guess there are worse ways to spend half a billion dollars, but I feel like that money would be much better spent on intra-solar missions and particle physics. Overall I think we got a pretty poor return on investment on this one.

Of course the James Webb telescope will be entirely in a league of its own, though. The Hubble was way too much of a success to deny its replacement with the technology of today.
:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#6 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #6 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 11:32 AM
18,629 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Well I think the real problem here is that NASA’s budget is criminally small.

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#7 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #7 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:18 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 18 Apr 2014 – 08:02 AM, said:
Well, JWST is going to end up being more than 4 times the original cost estimate. That was a big reason for potentially canceling it. I have no doubt it will produce amazing science, but it has really squeezed the rest of NASA’s science budget, including the missions/grants that I want to tap into.

:huh: It hasn’t laid the groundwork, it HAS detected thousands of planets. It has completely changed our understanding of how star systems develop and what types of planets are most common. It has found that planets between the size of Earth and Neptune are extremely common in the universe and that our solar system is somewhat unusual that it DOESN’T have one. Kepler has been money very well spent.
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

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#8 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #8 pazzo83 Posted 18 April 2014 – 12:39 PM
18,629 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.

What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.

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#9 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #9 masomenos Posted 18 April 2014 – 08:12 PM
1,348 posts

pazzo83, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:39 PM, said:
What are you talking about? With a high enough resolution we can detect anything about these planets. Prior to Kepler, we had a very limited understanding about other planetary systems in the galaxy. The discoveries made by the telescope have changed astronomy, astrophysics, and our understanding of our place in the universe forever. Open your mind.
Can’t say I totally agree. We’re not even close to fully understanding the atmospheric compositions of planets within our own solar system, what makes you think we’re any closer to understanding planets 500 light years away? Kepler pretty much just confirmed things we generally knew about the universe. The general consensus that earth-like planets are relatively common in the galaxy and beyond had been formed over 20 years ago. Don’t get me wrong, the information gathered by Kepler is interesting and intriguing, but I just feel missions like Kepler aren’t the best use of our research budget.

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#10 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #10 RedSky Posted 19 April 2014 – 02:04 AM
4,859 posts

The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

January 2016 – month of the epic day 10 storm AND the epic storm

Winter 2015-2016 snow total 32.2″

10/18 – flurries
1/12 – .2″
1/17 – .3″
1/22-23 25″
2/5 – .7″
2/9-11 4.3″
2/15 – 1″
3/4 – .7″
5/15 – T

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#11 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #11 WxUSAF Posted 21 April 2014 – 08:05 AM
12,769 posts

Orographic Lift, on 18 Apr 2014 – 12:18 PM, said:
Thousands? From what I’ve read and heard that number is fewer than 2000. That’s over a quarter million dollars per “discovered” planet. Planets we know virtually nothing about and will probably never know anything about. Even detecting their atmospheric compositions with any accuracy will also be nearly impossible. What’s worse are the headlines of “earth’s cousin”, “earth’s twin”, and the ridiculous artistic renderings that follow.
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.

Winter 2015-16 Snow: 29.5″
1/17/16 0.2″ ; 1/19/16 1.0″ ; 1/22-23/16 22.0″ ; 2/5/2016 0.5″; 2/9/2016 0.8″ ; 2/12-13/2016 0.4″; 2/15/2016 2.6″
3/3-4/16 2.0″
Winter 2014-15 Snow: 36.8″
Winter 2013-14 Snow: 60.6″ ; February 12-13, 2014: 18″
Winter 2012-13 Snow: 13.8″
Winter 2011-12 Snow: 3.2″
Winter 2010-11 Snow: 19.7″
Winter 2009-10 Snow: 89.6″ ; December 18-19 2009: 22.0″, February 5-6, 2010: 32.0″, February 9-10, 2010: 16.5″
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#12 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #12 masomenos Posted 23 April 2014 – 09:21 PM
1,348 posts

WxUSAF, on 21 Apr 2014 – 08:05 AM, said:
3845 as of a recent update
http://exoplanetarch…pac.caltech.edu

As I said, Kepler has completely changed our understanding of what a “common” planetary system contains. Our solar system is NOT the norm. That is a unexpected discovery that we would not have known without Kepler. The “follow on” mission to Kepler, called TESS, is designed to build off of Kepler’s discoveries and TESS will be finding planets that telescopes like JWST will be able to study directly.
3845…wow that’s a big jump from the last time I read up on Kepler sometime last year.

Even before we developed the tech necessary to discovering exo-planets, I think it would be beyond naive to assume that most planetary systems are similar to our own. I mean the varying compositions and arrangements of planetary systems throughout the galaxy and beyond are probably as numerous as the amount of stars themselves. The possibilities are endless and the true anomalies are beyond our wildest imaginations.

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#13 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #13 eyewall Posted 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM
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RedSky, on 19 Apr 2014 – 02:04 AM, said:
The habitable zone seems awful generous if it only receives the equivalent light of earth one hour before sunrise. That is significantly less light than mars receives.

We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.

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#14 NASA’s Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in ‘Habitable Zone’: post #14 Tyler Penland Posted 21 June 2014 – 05:15 PM

Future Met

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eyewall, on 16 May 2014 – 07:48 AM, said:
We have seen life can exist in pretty extreme environments right here on Earth.We can’t limit ourselves to the conditions we need for our own existence. With that said, the key for the habitable zone is a planet being able to support liquid water on the surface.
One minor problem with M-dwarfs, though, is that they are a bit, well, unstable. Pretty well known type for sudden decreases/increases in stellar output. Not that life couldn’t overcome that, but it would make it much more difficult.

Also, we don’t know yet if the particular planet in question (186f) is tidally locked for sure yet. What I’ve read suggests not but it’s more or less impossible to detect just yet.
http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/april/nasas-kepler-telescope-discovers-first-earth-size-planet-in-habitable-zone

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu/

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