http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/02/411534447/senateis-poised-to-vote-on-house-approved-usa-freedom-act

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/05/24/what-is-driving-silicon-valley-to-become-radicalized/

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2016/05/31/White-House-on-former-AG-Holders-remarks-Snowden-leaks-not-a-public-service/3571464722519/

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/may/22/how-pentagon-punished-nsa-whistleblowers

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/01/edward-snowden-chelsea-manning-barack-obama-pardon

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57869795

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57865399

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57865914

I only expected that they would do their job, but the CNN clowns are missing their job and don´t speak out when their politicians are lying. Can you remember the reporting before the Iraqinvasion, which of the CNN clowns spoke out against the illegal invasion based on lies? Why did Toobin, Zakarias and the other CNN Clowns repeated lies about Snowden and why didn´t they challenged ClintonII lies in the debate? That would be journalism, but if you sponsoring ClintonII and you are not informing the public infront of the debate about it, don´t expect from such clowns that they would challenge lies which are nearly as old as the communist under little Johns bed.

“Much like Manning, all of the dire consequences that were predicted when Snowden first leaked the NSA files to journalists have not come to pass. And we’ve seen enormous benefits since: Congress passed a historic NSA reform bill, an appeals court ruled the mass surveillance he exposed illegal, Obama implemented further changes to NSA practices, and tech companies have been using encryption to protect millions of people’s privacy where the law falls short.

Unfortunately, the White House is still spouting demonstrably false information in response to Holder. Speaking about his comments on Tuesday, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said: “The fact of the matter is there is a path for whistleblowers to take if they have legitimate concerns about what they are seeing, particularly when it comes to the handling of classified, sensitive information.”

Earnest is, to put it charitably, not telling the truth. Snowden was a contractor, and as such, by law, he did not have any of the whistleblower protections that an employee of the NSA would have. It’s amazing that the White House is still repeating this lie years after it was debunked.

On top of that, we know that the whistleblower protections in place at the time wouldn’t have helped him anyway. Look no further than the compelling investigative piece that Mark Hertsgaard published in the Guardian recently about a former NSA employee in charge of helping whistleblowers who had to become a whistleblower himself after the Pentagon attempted to destroy the life of Thomas Drake, who blew the whistle on NSA spying during the Bush administration.”

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/01/edward-snowden-chelsea-manning-barack-obama-pardon

Do yoiu get it John, you and Clinton and your media puppets from your sources are the liars, not MrSnowden. Usefull idiots like you are the problem, because you will buy every lie they have to sell for sheeps like you have not learned from history. Poor litte victem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yoyX6sNEqs And since you said there are more world famous journalist, he would not be the only “journalist” I had a look and see what I found. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo8Amd3rYUg Those Toobin seems even more talented to sell propaganda then clown Zakarias. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlpnNK_ptD0

Those CNN clowns may be world famous like Oreilly is, good for get drunk games and some laughs but not for journalism, even if you think they would be world famous your propaganda heros. Sad that an grown man has learned nothing from WWII over Vietnam
You keep bringing up Vietnam even though I have told you many times that Canada took no part in the Vietnam war. And, subsequently, Canada brought in 60,000 Vietnamese boat people refugees in 1979-80 or so. Your reply shows either a memory problem or someone else who is also ignorant and inept wrote a standard propaganda anti-American blurb.
Please try to understand what I am writing. It´s not about what Canada did, it´s about the stupidity of your sources and so yours…. https://theintercept.com/2016/05/20/pentagon-official-once-told-morley-safer-that-reporters-who-believe-the-government-are-stupid/
Please understand that the refugees need your help now in finding a place to live, getting three meals a day, and finding a job in one year — and that is reality. You are doing nothing except preach about news sources and human rights.

Iraq till today and is only a usefull idiot who is repeating every propaganda lie his unfree sources will plant into his head.

Propaganda yes, reality no.
So that is your new motto!

— show signature —
You have not understood much my washed friend, was the last turn too hot and too long?
Help the refugees.
Paul Farah
6/3/2016 3:13 PM EDT
I love the way people think they can ban encryption. That’s like saying “We are going to ban math.”
If the goal is to stop crime and terrorism, there are two things that would go a long way toward helping. First, end the ridiculous and immoral and unconstitutional “War on (Some) Drugs”. Second, stop interfering militarily in other countries. This will eliminate all of the crime associated with drug running, and most of the so-called terrorism. The need for “them” to access your data would thereby be sharply decreased.
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dblackshire
5/26/2016 1:13 AM EDT
“I grant that there is a radicalized subculture of engineers that is very prone to that delusion, but it is a delusion.”
Delusion what is that old saying just because I am paranoid does not mean that no one is looking. If anything the government has shown more and more a reason why they can not be trusted with following the law that they are suppose to uphold.

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Captain Quirk
5/28/2016 1:38 AM EDT [Edited]
I have to agree. And I’m not some radical government-hating paranoid “citizens’ militia”-type person.

But after witnessing government abuses like asset forfeiture and seizures of property from innocent people, the utter lack of punishment and outright immunity for prosecutors who use illegal means to convict innocent people, the courts’ refusal to hold bad cops accountable for their misbehavior, the Snowden revelations of illegal gov’t surveillance on all Americans, and everything else, I can’t be blamed for not trusting the government.
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Ol Hippy
5/26/2016 12:18 AM EDT
Interesting that nothing has been mentioned about the non-information from the famous iphone. People in the know knew thare was nothing on that “company” phone. The govt wasted a large amount of money and bluster for …nothing. Except maybe give a few people a clue that the govt just may not be as good as they claim to be. Our freedoms are slowly steadily being eroded away y the govt in their zeal to destroy the planet and humanity in the process. Some things NEED to be kept private.
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Brhurdle
5/26/2016 6:38 AM EDT
Please explain how “people in the know” knew there was nothing on the phone. It would have been negligent for the FBI to ignore a possible source of information on terrorist activities.
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Van W Wolverton
5/25/2016 10:56 PM EDT
Let us stipulate a few things:
(1) If something can be done it will be done—from genetic tinkering with pre-gestational humans to unbreakable (for the nonce) encryption.
(2) For that same nonce, law enforcement agencies and personnel—from the local cop to the head of the FBI and NSA—are the bad guys, and Edward Snowden, Tim Cook, and their ilk are the good guys.
(3) Unbreakable encryption will be used to its greatest practical effect by teenagers scoring beaucoup Likes (and the occasional hookup), and angry, genuinely radicalized young extremists planning and executing terrible acts of mayhem.
(4) If we are patient, temperate, and very very lucky, we will weather these developments without widespread war or severe inter-generational alienation.

The rest we can argue about.
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Balmoral-Medina
5/25/2016 9:15 PM EDT
Sure…a critical mass of social-adaptness-crippled, high-5-ing, fist-bumping communication-disabled, greasy-haired, Domino-Pizza-texting, hoody-wearing techy faux-thugsters in week-old underwear are exactly who I will turn to when I want to know more about how to make my technology “safer” all right…not a chance! Give them a bottle of body wash, an electric toothbrush, some dental floss and perhaps a trip to the laundro-mat and then we can talk.
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AlibiFarmer
5/25/2016 9:19 PM EDT
Always nice to see a well-reasoned argument addressing the logic of the situation. At least programming takes a rationality you sadly lack.
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sparkplug1
5/26/2016 5:40 PM EDT
They birthed the technology you are using now. How do you justify asserting your superiority to them?
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to_robert
5/25/2016 7:50 PM EDT
I wish the medical establishment would do it: your medical records are not secure, the hospital can give your records to the Fed or police and have no obligation they did so. Next time you visit your Dr. you may want to consider not going into detail on a subject that could see you land on a watch list. No kidding.
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eric654
5/25/2016 4:40 PM EDT
Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos said he was exploring measures to encrypt data and throw away the keys on devices owned by the Seattle-based company.

You should ask your boss why he would do that when he can use a user’s public key to encrypt. The user keeps the private key, not Amazon, and the government will have to beat it out of the user. They can’t get that key from Amazon.

Anything other than that means the key used to encrypt the data is in memory and can be snatched by malware or revealed by faulty software or captured by software installed by government directive.
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wolfemi1
5/25/2016 5:00 PM EDT
“You should ask your boss why he would do that when he can use a user’s public key to encrypt. The user keeps the private key, not Amazon, and the government will have to beat it out of the user. They can’t get that key from Amazon.”

Well yeah. Presumably, that’s what Amazon would be doing, just that they’d be generating the public-private pair, encrypting data with the public, and giving the private to the customer.
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eric654
5/25/2016 6:39 PM EDT
It’s good if you can supply the code to the user to create the private key own their own system, then have the code send out the public key only.
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wolfemi1
5/25/2016 7:11 PM EDT
“It’s good if you can supply the code to the user to create the private key own their own system, then have the code send out the public key only.”

Yep, though to be fair that’s a lot harder to actually say in a sound bite.
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hhhobbit
5/26/2016 3:11 PM EDT
“Anything other than that means the key used to encrypt the data is in memory and can be snatched by malware or revealed by faulty software or captured by software installed by government directive.”

Not necessarily since it depends on what you are using to make your symmetric cipher and what OS you are on. Now with all the Locky that I am analyzing on ‘nix it is unlikely they will do anything but for Windows a key logger will be more successful than trying to get stuff out of memory. This is especially true if you uise GnuPG with SECMEM set and never suspend to disk on shutdown like I do. But SECMEM is never suspended to disk anyway.

OTOH, securely removing the data from from disk does a dandy job of getting rid of data permanently. For the ‘nix (Linux, Unix, et al) I have my own but FreeBSD has it built in:

http://securemecca.com/public/srm/

I use srm to thoroughly remove the thousands of malware I go through every year. For Windows you need a commercial eraser and you MUST have mutliple passes. I was never able to guarantee an over-write with pseudo-random garbage or zeros on Windows. I haven’t even had a development system for Windows for years. But if you have a malware key logger on your Windows system you are hosed anyway. I have no problems with srm erasing files on a FAT32 system. I mount (attach) NTFS ro (read only).
skrut003
5/25/2016 1:53 PM EDT
Calling software engineers working to ensure people’s privacy “radicalized” is bizarre.
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wolfemi1
5/25/2016 4:27 PM EDT
True enough, I’d say that “principled” or “idealistic” would be a better fit.
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eric654
5/25/2016 4:42 PM EDT
I would use the word professional. There are no valid reasons to build systems with back doors or any other flaw that would reveal a key.
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wolfemi1
5/25/2016 5:02 PM EDT
” There are no valid reasons to build systems with back doors or any other flaw that would reveal a key.”

Right.

FWIW I also find it a bit silly that people are treating this as a new thing, when software engineers (as far as I can remember) have ALWAYS been EXTREMELY concerned with privacy as a group.
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eric654
5/25/2016 6:37 PM EDT
When I started writing PKI code in 2000 the small company told me how to write it. There was a guy with the PhD in cryptography, not me. I wrote it the way they told me to and it would have been very obvious if I added any kind of back door. It also would have been fairly obvious if they added one (although I might not have picked up on it).

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57865914

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/19/hypocrisy-freedom-julian-assange-wikileaks

“They” are not chosen ones that is for sure, they are normal people like those in the middle east, asia, africa, europe and easy to influence like other sheeps around the world and since there are so many things going totally wrong, you have these enormous number of couraged truthtellers coming forward from the US who realized that the world which are their politicians, schoolbooks and propaganda outlets (CNN,BBC,Fox,NYT,..) are selling is not the reality. “Illusion of freedom”

 

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57816402http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57811650http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57811713http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsanto-controls-both-the-white-house-and-the-us-congress/5336422http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsanto-controls-both-the-white-house-and-the-us-congress/5336422http://fracturedparadigm.com/2013/04/15/monsantos-dirty-dozen-the-12-most-awful-products-made-by-monsanto/http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/files/p/E~forums/57811650/aa73abfb30a84c2e83803c0c7b9ab763http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/files/p/E~forums/57811650/76a00d44593c4131ae12c9104d766e16http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/files/p/E~forums/57811650/29ccfbd6ef5244c19d0fc3155806ea70http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57828725http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57823514http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57825642http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57824050http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57819653http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57817159

http://nypost.com/2016/05/22/how-corporate-america-bought-hillary-clinton-for-21m

Not different enough to have to be tested but different enough to be patented, haha!

http://responsibletechnology.org/gmo-education/health-risks/

There are a few dangers here:

A tinkered with plant can dominate, cross pollinate with, and essentially push out, the original version. That may not be wise. There are already banks of original seeds set up, preserving the original line.

Some of the GM corn plants produce seeds that won’t germinate, a way for the GM company to insure that the farmers will keep buying from them.
Yes, and that clearly shows that it is not about ‘feeding the world’ but simply about making money. But it is even worse than that, it is nothing but an attempt by a few companies to control the global seed and food supply!

Don’t want that cross pollinating with someone else’s crop. The farmer using the GM seed could get sued by a neighbor who was raising corn for plantable seed.
Actually it works the other way round: Monsanto has hundreds of detectives trying to find fields of non-GMO farmers with some plants cross-pollinated by GM stuff and then sues these farmers for ‘illegally using’ their patented crap without paying any license fees!

RS
It makes you wonder why Michael Taylor was ever given that position, a position he should never have been allowed to be given. You see this same kind of conflict of interest across all regulatory agencies, probably why the Flint water crisis was so badly handled. This guy Taylor needs to be ousted. Let’s just say Trump is more qualified to be president than Taylor is to be in the FDA. And I don’t like Trump.

It makes you wonder why Michael Taylor was ever given that position, a position he should never have been allowed to be given. You see this same kind of conflict of interest across all regulatory agencies, probably why the Flint water crisis was so badly handled. This guy Taylor needs to be ousted. Let’s just say Trump is more qualified to be president than Taylor is to be in the FDA. And I don’t like Trump.

The more altruistic scientists in the industry hate companies like Monsanto because they know Monsanto only cares about itself, nothing else.

Both companies have their skeletons. Bayer produced a class of pesticides that’s been implicated in the honeybee and monarch butterfly die off. Monsanto’s bad record with PCBs, DDT, Dioxin, Agent Orange, etc.- well that speaks for itself. DuPont and PFOA is another one. There’s no other way to describe it other than chemical warfare.

http://nypost.com/2016/05/21/the-scandal-in-washington-no-one-is-talking-about/

Indeed- too many people just don’t read anymore- I guess they don’t remember “1984”. Or else they would have seen this coming a long time ago, the unholy union of authoritative governments and greedy global corporations. The future is going to be these companies running entire nations and waging war on each other with the innocent working class being the ones taking the brunt of it, while ‘terrorists’ are blamed as the cause, when they are merely an effect of what big brother/big money is doing.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57807207

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