Noted scholars like Dr. Cornelius West decry the fact that Obama betrayed Progressives with many of his actions, including continuing many of the policies of the Bush Administration. Those trade deals are horrible for all concerned, because they expand corporatocracy globally, and thanks to Obama fracking became an epidemic. Obama also looked the other way in appointing industry insiders into regulatory positions as well- and just look at some of his cohorts, like Rahm Emmanuel and how awful they have been. Obama has continued a war on whistleblowers, making reform much more difficult. Obama has been part of the problem, not part of the solution. Under him, if anything, Bush’s policies have continued, or even gotten worse. Neoliberalism is not different from neoconservatism, just two sides of the same coin

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57728163

No, government surveillance, as history has shown, is a slippery slope, and then they start doing that for everything. And when they take that power, they NEVER give it back, even after the “threat” has gone. History has taught us that. ISIS is a bunch of amateurs, I don’t care how much “hardware” they have, a mere footnote in the annals of history. They will fail eventually regardless of support or no support- their methods and tactics show they are desperate and vastly outnumbered by the other people in the area.

ISIS began largely because of American interference in the area. If America were more evenhanded and didn’t take sides, the ISIS threat disappears. This is not an organized national army we are talking about here.

People always over-react because they are afraid of the “latest” threat, I’ve read history and in terms of other threats that have faced the world, ISIS is but a gnat on the windshield of history. People have become spoiled and don’t know what real threats are anymore. I would list North Korea as a MUCH greater threat (nuclear power) and I still would not sacrifice freedom for them; for when you sacrifice freedom, you’ve already lost, because you’ve lost the ideals for which your country supposedly stood for- and that which you are fighting has already won. Win or lose by standing on your principles, anything less is still losing, no matter the outcome. Death is FAR preferable to giving up one’s principles and ideals. Because then the death actually means something. This seems to be lost on the western world of today, which is why it’s decaying and dying slowly- from the inside (a far worse outcome.) America is going the way of the Roman Empire, its reach far exceeding its grasp and constantly worrying about “barbarians” from the outside while slowly dying from the inside.

I believe the forefathers would agree with me, since they said as much in their quotes about freedom vs security.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57728163

No, government surveillance, as history has shown, is a slippery slope, and then they start doing that for everything. And when they take that power, they NEVER give it back, even after the “threat” has gone. History has taught us that. ISIS is a bunch of amateurs, I don’t care how much “hardware” they have, a mere footnote in the annals of history. They will fail eventually regardless of support or no support- their methods and tactics show they are desperate and vastly outnumbered by the other people in the area.

ISIS began largely because of American interference in the area. If America were more evenhanded and didn’t take sides, the ISIS threat disappears. This is not an organized national army we are talking about here.

People always over-react because they are afraid of the “latest” threat, I’ve read history and in terms of other threats that have faced the world, ISIS is but a gnat on the windshield of history. People have become spoiled and don’t know what real threats are anymore. I would list North Korea as a MUCH greater threat (nuclear power) and I still would not sacrifice freedom for them; for when you sacrifice freedom, you’ve already lost, because you’ve lost the ideals for which your country supposedly stood for- and that which you are fighting has already won. Win or lose by standing on your principles, anything less is still losing, no matter the outcome. Death is FAR preferable to giving up one’s principles and ideals. Because then the death actually means something. This seems to be lost on the western world of today, which is why it’s decaying and dying slowly- from the inside (a far worse outcome.) America is going the way of the Roman Empire, its reach far exceeding its grasp and constantly worrying about “barbarians” from the outside while slowly dying from the inside.

I believe the forefathers would agree with me, since they said as much in their quotes about freedom vs security.

Let’s get this out first- 99.9999999% chance of him losing and I -certainly- won’t vote for him (will probably go third party), but here is what I think would happen with a hypothetical Trump presidency.

1) Trump has some very silly ideas which I don’t think would ever get implemented because people from -neither- side of the aisle will listen to him.

2) He is a loose cannon but I don’t think that cannon will be allowed to unleash itself because the military itself won’t listen to him.

3) On the extremely positive side there will be a huge progressive movement in America like hasn’t been since the 60s. The 60s happened because of how authoritarian America had become with McArthyism and J Edgar Hoover and people had had enough and wanted to fight back. Note to the authoritarians- the worst thing you can do is anger people by trying to control what people think and do- that’s basic human psychology. The rubber band will snap in the other direction and there will be all hell to pay. Many activists and other progressives sitting on the side lines for way too long will join in and you’ll see an amazing revival of what we had in the ’60s and that is what will MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN. Without even knowing it, the orangutan in a monkey suit that is Trump will have catalyzed an entire movement against him and people will come together and we’ll see the social awareness and desire for social justice that we did back in the 60s. We are already starting to see this with all the protests! But there will be much more mass media coverage of this and other types of protests (election corruption protests, millions against monsanto, protests against Walmart using products made in sweat shops, animal rights protests, etc.) that have gotten far too little coverage by mainstream media (although the volume of people attending them was large) and will hopefully result in reforms in the electoral system and other reforms after Trump is gone. It will rightly correct the authoritarianism that began after 9/11 (“Patriot Act,”etc.) and the secret prejudices that people had will be brought to light. The one good thing about Trump is that he publicly showed his racist bigoted ways which will thus expose those who secretly espouse those views and make those people see how silly and irrational their fears are, and that the real danger are not third worlders who we have much in common with, but the real danger is a multibillionaire and others of his ilk who would seek to control the world just to make themselves more money and go on a powergrab. The blow back and the rubber band snapping will hit back hard not just on Trump, but on the fossil fuel industry, the militarization of the police force, the pharmaceutical industry and near monopolies like Monsanto in agribusiness and what will happen to all these corrupt industries- let’s just say I feel sorry for them when it happens. I think it will happen even if Trump doesn’t become president, but it will happen at a slower pace, but I find this “awakening” to be inevitable; we already see the beginnings of it (something that was predicted way back in the 80s.)

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57724588

Let’s get this out first- 99.9999999% chance of him losing and I -certainly- won’t vote for him (will probably go third party), but here is what I think would happen with a hypothetical Trump presidency.

1) Trump has some very silly ideas which I don’t think would ever get implemented because people from -neither- side of the aisle will listen to him.

2) He is a loose cannon but I don’t think that cannon will be allowed to unleash itself because the military itself won’t listen to him.

3) On the extremely positive side there will be a huge progressive movement in America like hasn’t been since the 60s. The 60s happened because of how authoritarian America had become with McArthyism and J Edgar Hoover and people had had enough and wanted to fight back. Note to the authoritarians- the worst thing you can do is anger people by trying to control what people think and do- that’s basic human psychology. The rubber band will snap in the other direction and there will be all hell to pay. Many activists and other progressives sitting on the side lines for way too long will join in and you’ll see an amazing revival of what we had in the ’60s and that is what will MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN. Without even knowing it, the orangutan in a monkey suit that is Trump will have catalyzed an entire movement against him and people will come together and we’ll see the social awareness and desire for social justice that we did back in the 60s. We are already starting to see this with all the protests! But there will be much more mass media coverage of this and other types of protests (election corruption protests, millions against monsanto, protests against Walmart using products made in sweat shops, animal rights protests, etc.) that have gotten far too little coverage by mainstream media (although the volume of people attending them was large) and will hopefully result in reforms in the electoral system and other reforms after Trump is gone. It will rightly correct the authoritarianism that began after 9/11 (“Patriot Act,”etc.) and the secret prejudices that people had will be brought to light. The one good thing about Trump is that he publicly showed his racist bigoted ways which will thus expose those who secretly espouse those views and make those people see how silly and irrational their fears are, and that the real danger are not third worlders who we have much in common with, but the real danger is a multibillionaire and others of his ilk who would seek to control the world just to make themselves more money and go on a powergrab. The blow back and the rubber band snapping will hit back hard not just on Trump, but on the fossil fuel industry, the militarization of the police force, the pharmaceutical industry, the wretappers in gov’t, and near monopolies like Monsanto in agribusiness and what will happen to all these corrupt industries- let’s just say I feel sorry for them when it happens. I think it will happen even if Trump doesn’t become president, but it will happen at a slower pace, but I find this “awakening” to be inevitable; we already see the beginnings of it (something that was predicted way back in the 80s.)

Let’s get this out first- 99.9999999% chance of him losing and I -certainly- won’t vote for him (will probably go third party), but here is what I think would happen with a hypothetical Trump presidency.

1) Trump has some very silly ideas which I don’t think would ever get implemented because people from -neither- side of the aisle will listen to him.

2) He is a loose cannon but I don’t think that cannon will be allowed to unleash itself because the military itself won’t listen to him.

3) On the extremely positive side there will be a huge progressive movement in America like hasn’t been since the 60s. The 60s happened because of how authoritarian America had become with McArthyism and J Edgar Hoover and people had had enough and wanted to fight back. Note to the authoritarians- the worst thing you can do is anger people by trying to control what people think and do- that’s basic human psychology. The rubber band will snap in the other direction and there will be all hell to pay. Many activists and other progressives sitting on the side lines for way too long will join in and you’ll see an amazing revival of what we had in the ’60s and that is what will MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN. Without even knowing it, the orangutan in a monkey suit that is Trump will have catalyzed an entire movement against him and people will come together and we’ll see the social awareness and desire for social justice that we did back in the 60s. We are already starting to see this with all the protests! But there will be much more mass media coverage of this and other types of protests (election corruption protests, millions against monsanto, protests against Walmart using products made in sweat shops, animal rights protests, etc.) that have gotten far too little coverage by mainstream media (although the volume of people attending them was large) and will hopefully result in reforms in the electoral system and other reforms after Trump is gone. It will rightly correct the authoritarianism that began after 9/11 (“Patriot Act,”etc.) and the secret prejudices that people had will be brought to light. The one good thing about Trump is that he publicly showed his racist bigoted ways which will thus expose those who secretly espouse those views and make those people see how silly and irrational their fears are, and that the real danger are not third worlders who we have much in common with, but the real danger is a multibillionaire and others of his ilk who would seek to control the world just to make themselves more money and go on a powergrab. The blow back and the rubber band snapping will hit back hard not just on Trump, but on the fossil fuel industry, the militarization of the police force, the pharmaceutical industry, the wretappers in gov’t, and near monopolies like Monsanto in agribusiness and what will happen to all these corrupt industries- let’s just say I feel sorry for them when it happens. I think it will happen even if Trump doesn’t become president, but it will happen at a slower pace, but I find this “awakening” to be inevitable; we already see the beginnings of it (something that was predicted way back in the 80s.)

https://t.co/SMnuIY7qUd

https://t.co/SMnuIY7qUd

https://t.co/lSYGpodUWq

https://t.co/5TcyjqvsUo

https://t.co/aQUbT4Pq8Q

https://t.co/6Ax4DGXQvQ

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861403

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862841

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861436

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862525
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862795%5D

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/855648
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862841

11 comments
Newest | Oldest
Jdee Richardson 15 hours ago
Interesting to note that Dr. Anne Schuchat is neither a psychiatrist nor a pediatrician.

Therapy is not as available as this article suggests it may be.
Like
jennifer manson 8 hours ago
@Jdee Richardson Your point is what?

Like
Dr. Eric Zurbrugg 18 hours ago
Why doesn’t the CDC develop an app for teaching parents behavioral modification. No drugs for little kids until the parent has logged on 100 times, taken the course and passed the test?

2Like
Dr. Eric Zurbrugg 18 hours ago
Suggesting to a parent that a little behavior modification could be heplful in managing a pre KG “problem child” will be met with rolling eyes and questions about food coloring and sugar in the diet, and, “he’s just like his father” and why can’t we just “give him a little something”

Please Get Real: the cat is out of the bag, Lehigh!

This is America where the mantra is “better living through chemistry”.

Ever notice how rare it is for East Asian immigrants to have kids on drugs for ADHD?

Heard of a kid recently who was on a full academic scholarship to our local state university, a Hope Scholar!

He pledged a frat the first semester, forgot to study, and was 10 days from finals w/o cracking a book.

His good frat bros’ gave him a 20 mg Adderall from the house “stash” and sent him to the library every morning till finals. He did a semester’s work in ten days, kept his Hope scholarship.

His mom was horrified, broke the law and all that, but insisted that he have his own “stash” since he must have ADHD because the med “worked” and, after watching the specials on PBS, she is sure he does.

Who has the time or inclination to argue with this lovely lady who is puzzled and troubled by any reluctance to prescribe?

Do you suppose Dr Suchardt at the CDC would talk with her?
1Like
Dr. Richard Kern 18 hours ago
There will be no more mental health professionals available to counsel parents on dealing with the behavior problems of their toddlers until health insurers become willing to pay for their services!! I am astonished that the CDC, which usually understands what happens in the real world, could be so blind to this that they release a statement calling for services that aren’t available or affordable. It’s not the mental health community that needs to be “responsive to this important call to action…,” it’s the health-insurance autocracy!

3Like
Lisa Unger 1 day ago
Read Some of Dr Gabor Mate’s work on ADHD, addiction and many other disorders. “Hold onto Your Kids” and “Scattered” are both wonderful books on this subject. These are primarily attachment disorders, a product of our modern society, read about the ongoing ACE study.

Like
Dr. James Weber 1 day ago
In most Rural areas —-behavioral therapy for ADHD does not even exist ! I love these articles that detail therapeutic protocols that are not even possible for those of outside of metropolitan areas .

5Like
Dr. arnold jacques 2 days ago
It is paramount to have whole family involved in all aspects of treatment of targetted patient.However insurance coverage may prove to b a major hurdle..also use of appropriate medication Is essential/always in combination w B/T to achieving expected response.

2Like
Dr. Mukund Gnanadesikan 2 days ago
Practitioners should be very cautious about diagnosing kids with ADHD before age 4. What is somewhat overstated, however, is the efficacy of behavior therapy for ADHD. It is most helpful for associated behaviors related to oppositional-defiant disorder, and for establishing common-sense routines and limits, which many parents struggle with in younger children.

Another issue is that part of the reason kids aren’t getting behavioral interventions is that good therapists with experience in that age group are not common and are not well-distributed around all areas of the country.
5Like
Dr. K. Van Davis 2 days ago
@Dr. Mukund Gnanadesikan Regarding the paucity of good therapists… apparently the same thing can be said about the rarity of good parenting and teaching skills.

2Like
Dr. Mukund Gnanadesikan 1 day ago
@Dr. K. Van Davis @Dr. Mukund Gnanadesikan To be fair, teaching and parenting a kid with ADHD is much harder than teaching or parenting a typically developing child. So what works for the “average” needs to be fine-tuned or even tossed aside, and that’s often what parents and teachers need to be reminded of.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862796

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861284

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861403

 

Advertisements